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Student Success

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Note from the editor

Stagnant enrollment, a shift to performance-based funding and the public's concern about the cost of higher education was pushing colleges to focus on ensuring — and showcasing  strong student outcomes before the coronavirus hit.

The pandemic is adding a twist, requiring college and university leaders to consider how to ensure students are meeting learning outcomes as instruction moves off campus, where students have inconsistent access to the internet and computers and could be dealing directly with the health and economic impacts of the virus.

It also heightens the imperative around existing student success efforts, though the situation makes them more challenging to execute. They include integrating remedial education with the rest of the curriculum, tailoring support services to the unique needs of online students and adult learners, and offering students tools to manage their mental health. 

This report examines how colleges are implementing those strategies and their effect on student success. As colleges continue to experience the effects of the pandemic, we'll be looking at how these areas are affected.

Thanks for reading,

Hallie Busta Senior Editor

As colleges switch to pass/fail amid coronavirus, what's the best approach?

There's no one way to make the change, but the effects will stick with students beyond the current semester.

Making student services accessible for online learners

As institutions enroll more remote adult students, they are realizing advising, career services and other supports must be available around the clock.

3 ways community colleges can support students during the coronavirus crisis

To meet the needs of their most vulnerable learners, these institutions should provide critical services such as help applying for government assistance.

College completion rates still rising in most states

Here's how community colleges are improving STEM education

Researchers and administrators share how to better serve students in these fields and warn of potential obstacles.

State plans to raise attainment vary

A new report shows states are vying to improve performance based on their unique social, educational and economic structures and workforce needs.

How colleges are changing remedial education

Fueled by research and the imperative to raise graduation rates, some institutions are revising or altogether replacing developmental classes.

As demand for mental health services grows, colleges give students new tools

Streamlined counseling centers, de-stress stations and well-being initiatives are helping serve a broader range of student needs.

Colleges focus on bringing back stopped-out students

Sagging enrollment and a greater focus on outcomes are pushing colleges to reenroll students instead of replacing them with new recruits.